Breaking spirit of fear

 

Father,

 

Thank You that You are the Unmovable Rock of my salvation (Psalm 18:2) and are far greater than my anxious and quavering heart (1 John 3:20). You tell me over and again in Your Word, “Do not fear,” but I forget easily and allow my heart to be heavy and weighted down with worry (Luke 21:34). Yuck.

 
My emotions can be like the storms of the sea — tossing this way and that. Yet I remember that no matter what is within my own heart, You are greater (Isaiah 55:9). In the very depths of my own weakness, I bow before You knowing that somehow my weakness is the very thing that initiates Your power (2 Corinthians 12:9). My weakness releases Your power to descend in strength (2 Corinthians 12:10). You tell me that You must increase and that I must decrease (John 3:30). So maybe getting comfortable in my own weakness is the very prerequisite for watching Your strength kick in (2 Corinthians 11:30). Selah.

 
Spirit of fear, you have no place in my life because anxiety never originates in God (2 Timothy 1:7). Jesus has given me all authority over the spirit of fear and your henchmen of despair, hopelessness, and worry (Luke 10:19; Mark 16:17-18).

 
Father, bind up the evil one as he calls the rulers of darkness onto the court of my mind and emotions. Thank You Lord for giving Your angels charge concerning me, to guard me in all my ways (Psalm 91:11). Thank You for sending out Your heavenly warriors as ministering spirits to help me in this area (Hebrews 1:14). Your invisible messengers bear me up every time I am about to trip (Psalm 91:12). Grant me boldness in prayer to tread upon the lion of doubt and the serpent of anxiety, treading them down until they are dust under my feet (Psalm 91:13; Psalm 18:37-42).

 
Grant me a glimpse of You each and every day, Lord (Psalm 17:15; 1 John 3:3). As You reveal Yourself, my focus will be riveted to Your splendor and fixed upon Your glory (2 Corinthians 3:18). May my eyes become so accustomed to seeing You that all else is undecipherable. Seeing You, the God of all peace, is the best way to know peace (2 Thessalonians 3:16). In Jesus’ name I pray.  Amen.

 

(Print out this prayer or save to your phone to pray daily)

Photo courtesy of Sara Jeng Grewar – follow her on Instagram.

 

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prbustingout

Why do breakthroughs in prayer surprise me?

 

I’d prayed over this request specifically for over two years, but God’s affirmative answer still shocked me. Maybe desperation holds more sway with God than I realized. In the course of this journey, I learned three powerful lessons regarding desperate prayer that will forever shape my critical intercession.

 

1) Just because prayer is a battle doesn’t mean I have to accept defeat.

 

When God gave the Israelites instructions for warfare, He said “When you go out to battle against your enemies and see…people more numerous than you, do not be afraid of them; for the Lord your God…is with you. Do not be afraid, or panic, or tremble before them. For the Lord Your God is the One Who goes with you — to fight for you against your enemies, to save you” (Deuteronomy 20:1, 3-4).

 

Fear and anxiety often describe my dread of the unknown. But evidently God knows that. “Stop it!” He says. “Don’t even let your mind go there. Look here at Me. I’m not only Your Commander-in-Chief. I’m also Your Father. I’ve got this!”

 

2) His Word blows away all opposition.

 

We don’t have to understand how His Word works (Mark 4:27), but the fact of the matter is He does work. When we pray His Word, power explodes. His Word is:

 

Sharp enough to slice away the competition (Hebrews 4:12)
Surging with Inner Life (Hebrews 4:12)
Far-reaching in effectiveness (Acts 6:7)
Forward advancing (Acts 12:24)
Forceful, potent, and dominant (Acts 19:20)
Constantly strengthened with fresh reinforcements (Colossians 1:6)
Activated to move quickly (2 Thessalonians 3:1)

Our prayers command power in direct proportion to our knowledge of His Truth.

 

3) When His Word has authority over your life, your life has authority over the enemy.

 

Under the old covenant, God promised to conquer the enemy of those who fully obeyed the written Law (Joshua 23:6,9). But when Christ came, He repealed that Law (Hebrews 7:12). He set aside all the complicated conditions for victory and gave us only one: faith (John 6:29). Our faith has victory because we believe (not in our own conduct but) in His indestructible life (Hebrews 7:18,16). “Through the obedience of One the many will be made righteous” (Romans 5:19). Not through mine!

 

Under the new covenant, God promises to conquer the enemy of those who faith Him (1 John 5:4). When we hold up the shield of faith and move offensively with the sword of His Word, our prayers pack a punch. “One of your men puts to flight a thousand, for the Lord your God is He who fights for you, just as He promised you” (Joshua 23:10). “A thousand may fall at your side, and ten thousand at your right hand, but it shall not approach you (Psalms 91:7).

 

But what about the crafty serpent — the devil, who prowls about like a roaring lion (Genesis 3:1; 1 Peter 5:8)?

 

“The battle is not yours, but God’s (2 Chronicles 20:15). “You will tread upon the lion and cobra, the young lion and the serpent you will trample down” (Psalm 91:13). “Behold,” says Jesus, “I have given you authority to tread upon serpents and scorpions, and over all the power of the enemy, and nothing shall injure you” (Luke 10:19).

 

Let’s go to the war room together this week, shall we?

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