From God’s viewpoint, there were only two tablets worth of laws. Since He wrote them Himself, He must have had in mind how much stone it would take.

 

But, when the Pharisees’s came along, they decided the law needed more detail. In fact, they added pages and pages of interpretation. People like that really annoy me. What about you?

 

Yet, the Apostle James said that when we quibble that another Christian isn’t doing it our way, we are setting up random laws just like the Pharisees. “He who speaks against a brother, and judges his brother, speaks against the law, and judges the law” (James 4:11).

 

You see, God’s law in Christ Jesus is meant to actually simplify our rule-keeping rather than increase it. You’ve been set free from meticulous perfectionism. There is now only one Law: Life.

 

Life-Law is hearing moment by moment what to do next. This is done by listening directly to His Spirit. We are no longer bound by religious “ought-to’s”.

 

 

We don’t escape from legalism (or sin for that matter) by predetermining what we will do next. That has never worked. And still won’t .

 

Instead, the plan is to simply agree with His plan. We turn the “doing of it” over to Him. 

 

Predetermining procedures simply takes the Life-breath out of walking in the Spirit

 

Fastidiously splitting hairs just drags others into our misery. Before we know it, we are pressing them into our self-made mold and trash-talking them when they slip out. 

 

If God has not particularly spelled out a mode of action in His Word, He must have a broad interpretation for the way it can be enacted. 

 

Then why do we think our particular interpretation is the only way it can be achieved? (It’s the Lord who will accomplish what concerns you, remember?

 

For the most part, let others be, dear Christian.  

 

Do not speak against one another.

 

That’s the only way to give God space to work within you. 

 

We are to do what the Life-law breathes upon us to do – and that is usually something simple like keeping your mouth shut or loving the unlovely. 

 

Let God breathe suitable actions into your fellow Christian. That’s when BodyLife will work. He is working everything out for the good of the whole.

 

 

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I was stunned. I had known Phoebe since our girls were little. She had been to our home many times and always read to the girls when it was their bedtime. 

 

Later, Phoebe had worked tirelessly in a small town, doing menial jobs so that she could share the gospel with those around her. She had been a great encouragement to the pastor and his wife, often the only faithful attendee in the fledgling congregation. 

 

When we heard Phoebe was discouraged, we visited and prayed with her. She was indeed a long way from home and missed her family sorely. Yet, what she didn’t tell us was that she was already struggling with the validity of Truth.

 

I’ll bet that you have a Phoebe in your life, huh?

 

She was one of those mystery people, who “suddenly” cashed it all in to go their own way.

 

Evidently its a Biblical reality as so many writers make some mention of it: John, Peter, James

 

But, what is our response?

 

Let’s compare the wording of both James and Peter as we sort this together:

 

My brethren, if any among you strays from the truth and one turns him back, let him know that he who turns a sinner from the error of his way will save his soul from death and will cover a multitude of sins.” James 5:19-20

 

“Above all, keep fervent in your love for one another, because love covers a multitude of sins.” 1 Peter 4:8

 

Notice the overlap?

 

Anyone that strays from Truth must be dealt with in love. 

 

Unfortunately, I tend to waffle between a hardline, judgmental approach

or a “I’m not going to say anything” approach. 

 

Neither is true love. 

 

Pause for a moment to bring up your “Phoebe” before God in prayer

 

Now, let’s allow the Father to direct our thoughts on their behalf:

 

Despite their sin, have we been patient with them? (“Love is patient”) 

 

When we speak about them to others, have our words been kind? (“Love is kind)

 

When their absence at church is mentioned, do we have an arrogant, “holier than thou” attitude? (“Love is not arrogant”)

 

Has their action embarrassed us or made us angry? (“Love is not provoked and doesn’t take into account a wrong suffered”)

 

Have we given up on their return and grew tired of praying for them? (“Love bears all things, believes all things, hopes all things, endures all things”)

 

Have we failed to pray for them recently? (“Love never fails”)

 

Will our love be one to cover a multitude of sins?

 

May it be so my dear friend. May it be so for both of us.

 

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